3 Clever Tips for Concealed Carry In Warm Weather

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It’s a cinch to carry without printing in the winter months. All the heavy clothing makes it simple to keep your firearm out of the prying eyes of others. Doing the same during the summer months, on the other hand, is a totally different matter.

When it’s 80 degrees plus outside, there aren’t many easy options to cover up your firearm. Therefore, it becomes much easier to accidentally expose your firearm to public observers and passersby.

Here are five simple tips to make sure your concealed weapon stays your business, and your business only.

1. Choose the Smallest Acceptable Firearm
From The Well Armed Woman:
Although not the ideal solution, as we don’t want to give up firepower if we don’t have to, carrying a smaller gun in the summer months is an option and is better than not carrying any gun at all. If you can afford a second gun, the very small and compact semi-automatics and lightweight revolvers are very easy to hide. Some are now so slim that they don’t create a bulge, (and who needs more of those?) You may want to research the available holsters for these models prior to purchasing to make sure the type of holster you want to wear is available for it. Keep in mind that smaller, lighter guns will have quite a bit more recoil to contend with. They simply don’t have the weight and size necessary to absorb the energy.

2. Try an Inside the Waistband (IWB) Holster
From American Concealed:
Inside the Waistband (IWB) holsters are a less revealing option and fit nicely under a t-shirt and pants. These give the handgun a low profile, rather than allowing the gun to bulge out along the waistline. Choose a smaller, more compact weapon because a larger model may dig into your torso or leg.

3. Utilize Deep Concealment
From Second Call Defense:
Your choices for deep concealment seem almost endless these days, including belly bands, appendix carry pouches, and bra holsters. Some of these methods require you to get past clothing used as cover, which makes drawing more difficult. But assuming you practice and feel comfortable that you can draw effectively in a high-stress situation, these are all additional options to consider.

Whether you change your method of carry for one day or the entire season, remember the importance of becoming familiar with your method of carry. Practice with an unloaded firearm and work out all the kinks in your draw stroke. It has to become second nature.

In a life-or-death situation, you won’t have time to think. You’ll have about 1.5 seconds and will have to depend on muscle memory to deploy your weapon properly.

A smaller firearm, for example, has a smaller grip and a shorter distance between the front and rear sight, making it more difficult to score accurate hits. Dry fire practice is essential. Remember, all it takes is a little time and effort to build muscle memory with your secondary firearm or alternate method of carry. You’re not starting from scratch. You’re simply building on your existing skills to create a new skill set with different equipment.Your choices for deep concealment seem almost endless these days, including belly bands, appendix carry pouches, and bra holsters. Some of these methods require you to get past clothing used as cover, which makes drawing more difficult. But assuming you practice and feel comfortable that you can draw effectively in a high-stress situation, these are all additional options to consider.

Whether you change your method of carry for one day or the entire season, remember the importance of becoming familiar with your method of carry. Practice with an unloaded firearm and work out all the kinks in your draw stroke. It has to become second nature.

In a life-or-death situation, you won’t have time to think. You’ll have about 1.5 seconds and will have to depend on muscle memory to deploy your weapon properly.

A smaller firearm, for example, has a smaller grip and a shorter distance between the front and rear sight, making it more difficult to score accurate hits. Dry fire practice is essential. Remember, all it takes is a little time and effort to build muscle memory with your secondary firearm or alternate method of carry. You’re not starting from scratch. You’re simply building on your existing skills to create a new skill set with different equipment.

How Do You Carry In Hot Weather?
Do you have any good tips for keeping your concealed weapon concealed when the mercury starts to climb? Drop your advice in the comments!

28 COMMENTS

  1. I usually carry off body in a handbag equipped with a holster in a separate compartment, so climate has no effect.

  2. I have a small on the belt holster and will just not have my shirt tucked into trousers – casual dress appearance but gun concealed and easy to draw.

  3. I personally use the PDA holster for my Ruger lc9s. I guess Sneaky Pete holsters will do the same thing. Here in Florida it does get hot. i also use the in the waist band Alien gear holster.

  4. Like Jim, Rt front pocket with speedstrip 2-at-a-time reload for my airweight Smith revolver. Winter is harder than Summer for me.

  5. I live in Tennessee where it get pretty hot in the summer. What I do with my Glock 26 in summer is to wear a very light T-shirt over my belt and gun. And over that a very light short sleeve shirt completely open in the front. That way, if the short sleeve shirt blows open by the wind (or even a slight breeze walking into a store), my gun is still hidden by the T-shirt. It is very easy to pull the T-shirt up to gain clear access to my gun if needed.

  6. I carry a Ruger P85 9mm. I am a surveyor and work along the border or very near it. I prefer to wear shorts and tee shirts, but lately due to my fair skin I need to cover my arms. Big hat takes care of the rest. To conceal my weapon I wear a very light cotton wind breaker. Sweat is an issue even with the stainless steel. So, I elected to wear shoulder holster and that seems to work. I have tried all kinds of clip on, but at the end of the day the weapon is covered in salt!

  7. I wear jeans all the time, so I have to carry outside my waistband. I carry a colt 380 auto mustang and the holster is a sneaky- pete, looks like cell phone case, never have been questions and I wear it everywhere.

  8. I use a PDA holster on my belt here in Florida. I don’t have to worry about sweat. I also use an Alien gear IWB holster, when its not too warm.

  9. I live in the southern California desert with temperatures reaching 100+ degrees.

    I wear a t-shirt so my sweat doesn’t cause me to stick to my handgun, a .357 J-frame

    I am careful about the over shirts I buy – wrinkle free cotton (for comfort and coolness – noting in polyesters or synthetics because they suck). I get the extra tall version with a straight cut, usually (but not always) Hawaiian prints. The hem of the shirt usually rides about 3″ below the bottom of the closed holster giving me good concealment and quick access for an easy draw.

  10. I carry in a small tactical messenger bag. That way I can carry 3 spare mags for my .40 given the islamo-threat these days.

  11. McDonald’s hamburger bag. Nobody has ever looked for or expected a “J” frame S&W or even a 3913 S&W in a hamburger bag. On the seat of your car, in your hand while strolling the streets…it’s right there.

  12. I still carry my G19 under a T shirt in an owb kydex holster that fits very close to my hip because it is vacuum formed on a curve

  13. I have a small camera belt case in which my Ruger LCP fits quite nicely. It even has a seperate cel phone pocket. You would never guess I was carrying.

  14. I carry an SCCY CPX-2, which is a compact 9mm that holds 10 rounds, in an IWB holster that I mount in the small of my back because I have gotten rounder with age (lol) and it adds too much width on my side. After years of carrying this way, I have become adept, through practice, at clearing my shirt or jacket and drawing.

  15. Sneaky Pete. I have tried IWB, belt loop type, etc. NONE comes close to my SP with a Bersa Thunder 380.
    Even if my SP gets exposed no one really knows what it is or what’s in it.

  16. I live in AL. In the summer, I opt for open carry. I know there are arguments for and against but I find it more comfortable and just easier. Though I’d love to have a 380, finances don’t allow for it at this moment so I have my Glock 30 & a regular holster at the hip. Just works for me.

  17. I use a Taurus 85 in a “Thunderwear” holster next to my groin–living in Florida, it’s warm weather for 9-10 months of the year, so this is how I carry all the time, unless it’s cold enough to wear a coat–then I use an OWB holster. That way, I stay familiar with the pistol, and the draw.

  18. Looking around @ Walmart recently I saw a number of cell-phone cases that appear to be large enough for my just purchased Ruger LCP, some with belt loops

  19. At times I wear a firearm on a belt under my pants and atop my underwear. Either a IWB or OWB works with this set-up. It helps if your trousers or shorts are loose and it is harder to get-to, but not too hard. You can then wear a T-shirt or sports shirt either out on tucked in.

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